Aeroplane Windows Are Frames to an Ethereal Image of your World

Who hasn’t snapped a quick photograph out the window of an aeroplane? Whether an attempt to capture cotton candy clouds, an incredible sunrise, or the looming landscape down below, many of us are fascinated with this bird’s-eye view of earth. French photographer Arnaud Moro has taken this interest and transformed it into an ethereal series of images entitled Hublots.

Equipped with a desire to tell stories, Arnaud quickly realised the potential of turning his travels into a photo series. Over the past few years, he has captured dozens of images in flight, mostly on his Canon 5D Mark II. The result, Hublots – French for “portholes” – paints a transient picture of magic moments suspended above our planet.

36

In a rare moment Moro was earth-bound, we were able to catch up remotely about his favourite places and views, how he got started, and what’s he’s currently doing in Nepal.

TP: Tell us about your first memory of flying.
Arnaud Moro:
My first memory of flying, I was four years old and I was going to the USA. I was making a drawing of a deer and I remember the exact color of the pencil I was using. On the other hand, the first photo of the photo series was in 2012, the 22nd of December on a cold morning. I was going to London for Christmas with my family.

8

TP: There’s a lot of play between dreamy, soft photos and crisp landscape shots in this series. Can you tell us about your thoughts behind this?
AM:
What I liked was playing with all the atmospheres. I took a lot on the plane at different times and I saw night, morning, daylight, evening in different places, and I liked playing with all these lights and landscapes. I also liked to play with the portholes in the frame so they are like the frame of a painting.

5

TP: How much editing do these images usually get after being taken?
AM:
Not a lot of editing, in this photo series I didn’t pushed too much the colour grading, I kept it natural. I just use some curves and selective correction.

TP: Some of these photos appear to have been taken in the cockpit – how did you make that work?
AM:
That’s my little secret! Haha. But what is sure is that I can’t do it anymore.

43

TP: How do you think your style as a photographer and videographer has changed through the years?
AM:
Yeah, with the years your inspiration changes, your mood and your creativity evolve and make you see different things than before. With the years you can discover yourself and what you like so you can take the time to be yourself in the pictures.

My photos and the way I color grade changed so much with the years and I’m happy with it. You don’t stay in your comfort zone. When it’s the same all the time for years, it starts to be boring.

23

TP: You’re currently in Nepal- what’s in the works for you there?
AM:
I’m doing a cinematic video documentary about a guy covered in tattoos everywhere, and we are in Nepal for a big challenge for both of us. For me, going out of my comfort zone- we plan to go cross one of the highest passes in the world at 5416m altitude.

The documentary is about his life and his way of thinking, kind of a life lesson. We are now at 3500m altitude. We are taking a rest day and we are moving tomorrow up to 4100m, after tomorrow to 5000m and in three days Thorung La Pass! Hopefully we will be fine with the altitude sickness, everything is all right for now.

1
18
26
3
11
25
47
37
34
46
2
16
4
14
6
21
10
12
28
22
13
40
44
35
45
29
42
30
24
7
15
17
19
20
41
27
31
33
38
39