A Cinematic Apocalypse for the American Dream

French Graphic designer Mainger Germain‘s light-hearted, witty, and exceedingly re-grammable output has made him a firm favourite and two-time previous feature at The Plus; first for his cinematic take on the hipster branding fad, and once more for his catalogue of our favourite cinema characters and their hot-rod rides of choice. This previous graphic arts student of the Saint Luc Institute in Belgium has a distinctly cinematic outlook on his work, one which continues to be apparent in this new set of enigmatic floating neon signs.

FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (1)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (2)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (3)

In a more abstract progression from explicit mainstream movie reference to this more haunting and allusive signage, Mainger has created a set of signs that raise the hairs on the back of our necks and pique the underlying attraction so any of us feel to the great American highway. Capturing the pulsing decay of so many cult classics, Mainger’s new set is a visible twist on his older work. We caught up with him again to see how he’s been doing.

The Plus: Could you tell us a little about the concept – why floating neon signs?
Mainger Germain:
I am fascinated by the ’50s and ’60s and by the American landscape, desert, road, architecture, restaurant and petrol stations, and especially neon and vintage signs. I wanted to highlight them in an apocalyptic atmosphere.

FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (4)

TP: Was there a story behind this apocalyptic undercurrent? Why are you attracted to it?
MG:
When I see an abandoned gas station, I immediately see an apocalyptic atmosphere : the desert, no life, no fuel, no food, I just love the concept.

TP: How would you fare in an apocalypse?
MG:
I don’t know… I would have with me a baseball bat called Lucille.

FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (5)

TP: How do you make an image like this?
MG:
I work on Photoshop of course, and I play with colours, saturation etc., and I add some effects and object to give credibility to the image.

TP: You’re body of work is great – and large. How does your approach have to change for each project – and was there something different about the way you approached this one?
MG:
My main activity is the creation of cinema poster revisited, and I love the American cinema of the 80s and 90s. They are the two decades that have approached the post apocalyptic universe and valued these American themes. So there is a central theme in each of my projects.

FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (6)

TP: Why not work from photo, and not illustrations, to create your images?
MG:
I had already work on the theme of vintage signs before. So it was a mix with the retro signs and the cinema.

TP: What next?
MG:
I don’t know, I will continue to work on the posters, and we will see what will follow.

FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (7)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (8)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (9)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (10)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (11)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (12)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (13)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (14)
FlyingNeonSigns - Mainger (15)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

comments policy

  • - Please don't leave racist, homophobic, sexist or other offensive comments.
  • - Please don't use any offensive words.
  • - Please don't use this comments section for self promotion.
  • - Please don't get too personal.